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In The News

Dr. Beam was recently featured on Eyewitness News 3 (WFSB-TV), regarding the tummy tuck procedure. The patient featured in the story, Corey, is a mother to five children, including a set of twins, who had four C-sections. Even though Corey ate healthy and exercised regularly after the birth of all of her children, the fat around her abdomen would not go away.

She ultimately turned to Dr. Bean to undergo a tummy tuck, and couldn’t be happier with the results. The results have completely changed the look of Corey’s mid-section and improved her self-esteem. But don’t take our word for it; watch this clip and listen to Corey explain why it’s important for mom to be happy.

Harold E. Beam, M.D.

Keep them guessing…

Dr. Beam is now offering the Natrelle 410 implant. If you’re considering a breast augmentation, you now have the option of a round or anatomically shaped profile. Click here to read more…

 

Harold E. Beam, M.D.

On September 12, 2013, Dr. Beam had the privilege of participating in the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Advocacy Event in Washington, DC. He joined a team of 22 surgeons on Capitol Hill advocating for issues such as the Breast Cancer Patient Education Act and healthcare marketing. The Breast Cancer Patient Education Act seeks to inform and empower women to make health care decisions that best meet their particular needs. It requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services to design and implement an education campaign to inform women of the availability and coverage of breast reconstruction, prostheses and other options. The educational materials would inform women that breast reconstruction is possible at the time of breast cancer surgery, it may be delayed until after other treatments, or they may choose not to have reconstruction and be informed of the availability of prostheses or breast forms. Also, educational materials would inform breast cancer patients that federal law mandates coverage of breast reconstruction, even if such reconstruction is delayed until after other treatments.